Posts Tagged ‘news’

IMG_7618.JPG4 years ago I made the decision that I was sick and tired of being sick and tired being a Negative Nancy and being down in the dumps constantly. 6 months of a deep depression where I had lost almost 70 pounds due to stress and anxiety, unable to complete sentences because my mind would not allow me to choose the right words in fear of saying something wrong, weeks upon weeks of insomnia in which even if I was able to fall asleep, I’d wake up in the middle of the night with sweat-soaked pillows….a point in my life I wouldn’t wish upon ANYBODY, but I know people who are in my life currently are at.

What I realized that day was that I had not only the ability to choose thoughts that empowered me, but the responsibility to do so….not only for myself, but for people in my life that DEPENDED on me. In a world that pumps us full of negative information from the TV, the Internet, the radio, the check-out lane gossip magazines to the people in our lives that thrive on neighborhood gossip…I CHOSE to inoculate myself with the teachings of Les Brown, Tony Robbins, Jim Rohn, Zig Ziglar….and I still have the bookmark folder on my internet browser I titled “cognitive development” to prove and remind me of it. I chose not to live being dependent on anti-depressants or anti-anxiety pills for the rest of my life….and instead chose to take full responsibility for my life and the happenings in it and chose to be bigger than my problems by RE-WIRING and RE-TRAINING my brain. Personal development is the exercise your brain needs…just like those squats you do for your butt. No personal development and your brain atrophies.

Worry is a useless emotion…once you understand just what it is. If you’re going to THINK about a future event, you might as well think positively about it and fill that time reading or listening to things that empower you…not by listening to the voice in your head that continues to scare you.

My Christmas wish is for everyone who is currently suffering from depression to take steps to start to re-train their brain. Your past does not equal the future….and nobody’s opinion of you equals your reality. Each and every one of us has the ability to make today the first day of the rest of our life….and make it the BEST of our life.

God bless.

In a follow up to my last post, I stumbled upon one of my favorite discussions of Les Brown. I had first seen this over a year ago.

We all may not know what we want to do in life, what our goals are, what are dreams are….but we all know when we get that icky feeling deep down inside when we’re doing something that we KNOW isn’t what we want to do. In this video, Les talks about how we need to stop playing it safe. He says, “If you go through life being casual, you’ll end up a casuality.” You see, my passion in life has sprung out of the lowest low of my life. I know first hand what work-related stress can do to someone physically and mentally. Stress is the number one cause for heart disease, which in fact, is the number one cause of death amongst Americans today. Life is too short to creep through life…find your passion and pursue it wholeheartedly. It can actually EXTEND your life.

“The majority of people suffer their first major heart attack on Monday morning, between 8 am and 9 am, people getting ready to go to jobs that they don’t like. Jobs that are making them sick. You see, when you’re not pursuing your goal, you are literally comitting spiritual suicide. When you have some goal out here that you’re stretching for and reaching for that takes you out of your comfort zone, you’ll find out some talents and abilities that you didn’t know you had!” -Les Brown

What are your limiting beliefs about your personality? Ever wished you had more friends or were able to be more outgoing but instead chalked it up as ok because you’re “anti-social” and that’s ok because that’s “just how you are”?

We all have the ability to be excellent. Excellent obviously comes from the word excel, which means to rise above, to be superior, to do extremely well. What are we saying to ourselves when we say it’s ok to be average? Not just ourselves but in particular aspects of our lives? I think way to often we are taught from our parents and role models that it’s ok to be “who we are”. I think it’s a tragedy. It is engrained in our heads from the moment we are born that if we are lacking in a certain aspect of our personalities, that it is OKAY. We are taught that there is nothing we can do to change or improve that area, it’s just how we were made. Sooner or later in life when that aspect of our life that is lacking faces a challenge, if we can’t properly work through it because we’ve always been taught to accept our shortcomings as a biological truth, personal disaster will strike.

We all need to be taught that we all have the power within ourselves to improve. Today can be just another day of a continuous whirlwind of shit, constantly accepting that any bad things will happen because they are destined to happen to me because that’s just how it is, or it can be day 1 of the beginning of excellence.

What are some things about yourself that you have always wanted to change but have always just said “that’s just how I am”?

Paying bills is fun, right?

Growing up on Saint Paul, MN’s West Side, having went to a high school where 25% of the people who I started the ninth grade with didn’t graduate with me four years later, it’s easy to get into a mindset of being fearful of being successful. We are taught inadvertently by our environment to look at those who are “well-to-do” or “rich” in a negative light. This is evidenced by sayings that we all heard growing up such as “Filthy Rich” and the like.

Let’s have a discussion here. I’m a very logical guy, so I’m going to follow a very logical format. We all grow up wanting to live the lavish lifestyle, dreaming of never having to work, dreams of relaxing on the beach without a care in the world, wishing all the bills would just pay themselves and finally getting to shed that stress and anxiety each time the 1st of the month comes and the rent or mortgage was due, correct?

So what do we do? We look at people that have what we want – everything I’ve mentioned in the above paragraph – and we say they are lucky, or maybe we are even jealous that they don’t have to endure the stresses that we do today. We THINK that everything they have in their life has been handed to them and they don’t know how it is to walk even a block in our shoes. We curse those who have more than us.

Is it their fault? No. There is a old Polynesian saying that says, “Bless that which you want.” How can you get the things you want out of life if you constantly curse those which have what you want? If you think that the people that have what you want are merely “lucky”, then you must think that someday this “luck” will happen to you, right? Wrong. It won’t! By dismissing those who have what you want, you are associating negative thoughts to the things that you SAY you want to most. Notice my choice of words. Just because you say you want something, doesn’t make it true. It’s what you think, it’s how you view them, it’s what you believe. If you think rich people are the devil, you are constantly pushing away any possibility for you to be financially free. Chances are that you will spend your life constantly struggling to pay the bills and will have hardly any cash on reserve for emergencies. Oh, the alternator went out in your car? Your water heater went out in your house? These things we have hardly any control of, in fact, we KNOW they aren’t built to last but those with a poverty mindset will associate these events that we know will happen at one point in time or another as “oh, poor me” or “the worst things always happen to me”.

If you want a life free of stress, anxiety, constant struggle, try changing your financial mindset. In the following video of Dr. Walter Sims, he explains that “money is not the root of all evil, only the LOVE of money is.”

I’d like to take the last day before this holiday weekend to recognize some friends who have had some absolutely remarkable things happen for them these past few months! We can always stand to step back for a few moments and appreciate the good things in our lives. I heard a saying yesterday that will stick with me for quite some time – “You can’t get a good look at the picture, if you’re part of the frame.” Well today, I’d like to show some recognition to my friends for some of their recent accomplishments.

1)

Great work on your mile run, Bill!

Bill Lage of 365 Things To Do In The Twin Cities recently ran the Medtronic Twin Cities 1 Mile, and ran it in 10:06, coming up short of his goal to run it in under 10 minutes. However, when the official results were posted on the website, Bill’s time came in at 9:37.9! Strong work, Bill!

2)

Andrew Lonergan promotes a healthy lifestyle and raises awareness about Diabetes Prevention on “Project Not Me”.

When my friend and business partner Andrew Lonergan told me last summer that he was going to be appearing in a new reality show, I thought he had gone crazy. But he is. Project Not Me will be airing this coming fall on Lifetime and is part of the Diabetes Prevention Program, aimed to raise awareness, help those that are at risk of Type 2 Diabetes and how people just like us can prevent this disease. Can’t wait until it airs, Lonny!!!

3)

David and his girlfriend Krystal in Las Vegas

In this economy, it’s scary for people of all ages. Just this week it was announced that two local Minnesota companies will be cutting jobs. Social Security will not be around for us. College kids are pumping millions and billions of dollars into their college education with little to no return on that investment because the job market is so dry. Well, tell that to my friend David Helegeson who got started with The Coolest Travel Club In The World about 10 months ago. With one decision to do something different in the travel industry, he has grown an organization of over 1200 customers allowing him to achieve the rank of Marketing Director in a worldwide, world-class company. He also received news that he will be speaking to hundreds of people at a conference in Cedar Rapids, Iowa in June to train people how they can do the same thing themselves. Proud of you, David!

4)

Lisa Larrive at her recent book signing for Grateful For Gluten-Free

My good friend and business partner Lisa Larrive has written a book called “Grateful For Gluten-Free.” It’s about a young girl named Gabby who has celiac disease. Gabby cannot eat foods with wheat or gluten, and she loves it when her Mom makes her favorite gluten-free food – PANCAKES! Gabby’s journey helps her discover how grateful she is to live gluten-free – not only because it is delicious, but because it can be fun too! Great work, Lisa, in raising the awareness for celiac disease and the gluten-free lifestyle. Please give her Grateful For Gluten-Free Facebook Page a like, and purchase a copy on Amazon.

Have you ever wondered how sometimes it feels like no matter how confident you are in accomplishing a task, you worry about how others are going to view you? Or maybe no matter how hard you work, the rewards always seem to limit themselves?

I have always been a very confident person. Always up for a challenge, there has never been a goal I haven’t given it my all to go after. Granted, I would be lying if I said that I’ve accomplished every single goal I’ve ever set in my life, but what I’m saying is that I’ve always been a go-getter, prove me wrong personality.

So if that has been my mentality ever since I can remember, why have my results always been limited? If I knew that I worked harder than I ever had at work, why was that never reflected in my income?

In the last 19 months or so of my life, I’ve been committed to figuring out why my results haven’t been what I feel like they should have been. Don’t get me wrong, I let go of any regret, resentment, anger, sadness, or any other emotion based on the past a LONG time ago. But what I felt like I needed to do is understand what my thoughts were in the past that led to my feelings, that led to my actions, that led to what was happening in my outer world. If I want to change what was going on in my outer world, I needed to change my actions that stem from my emotions and the thoughts that lead to those emotions. I have had to take a long, hard look at myself in the mirror. Why did I never make it past the “B” team in little league? Why did I go to college for three years only to stray away and NEVER get my degree? Why did I always seem to blow my money as soon as it came in? Why didn’t others ever take me seriously?

What I’ve found is that our outer world is the result of three things – our self-esteem, our self-image, and our self-worth. The combination of these three determines not only what we accomplish, but how likely others are more or less apt to follow you and be behind you and your accomplishments, as well as your rewards for your accomplishments. Now, it sounds pretty cut and dry, doesn’t it? I mean, when I first looked at this evaluation, myself – much like anyone else out there – would probably say the same thing I did. “I don’t need to question my self-esteem or anything else! I know I have high self-esteem, I don’t care what people think of me, and I’m definitely worth every single bit I get.” But for the sake of committing to improve, bare with me and hear me out. Because if only ONE of these areas are lacking, it reflects in the results you realize.

Self-EsteemHow I feel about myself. Am I confident in anything and everything I do? Sure, if I’ve been doing any activity for an extended period of time, I become more and more confident about accomplishing that task and doing it very well. But what about trying something new? Do I tackle a task head on or do I tend to over-analyze all of the possible negative outcomes that could happen if done poorly? People with a high self esteem tend to not only do things well, but they tend to not hesitate when trying new things. People with low self-esteem will fail, or not try at all because they fear that they will either not do them well or need to know every possible outcome to prepare themselves when they finally do it. This “fear” is like an anchor! How can you move forward and accomplish MORE if you are anchored right where you are? Life begins at the end of your comfort zone, the only way to move forward is to overcome the fear related to trying something new. Don’t overanalyze. Don’t feel like you need to know all of the information before you act. Don’t doubt your abilities. Don’t let fear hold you back.

1991 West Side “B” Team (I’m the tall twig in the center of the back row)

I remember playing little league baseball. If any of my friends are reading this who played baseball with me growing up, I’m sure you’ll get a kick out of this story. Sure, I made a hell of a lot of great plays in my times as a third baseman for the West Side Little League “B” Team. Most of the time I wasn’t afraid to get my bigger than average frame in front of a drive down the line or a shot right at my feet. But one particular game, we were up by 1 run and the bases were loaded against Hazel Park. My friend Brian was pitching and I was at my usual third base. There was one out, and a base hit to the outfield would tie the game. Top of the seventh. I began to analyze every single situation of what my reaction should be to a hit, which if you ask ANY baseball player, is a pretty normal activity between batters. It’s wanting to make the right move in the right situation.

“Ok, if its a dabbler down the my line I’ll charge and throw it to home. If its hit more on a line drive near the base i’ll step on third and either go home with it or to first. If it’s to my left, I’ll go to second so we can turn a double play.”

All of these thoughts rushed through my mind. Sure, reading this, it sounds like I was a confident little seventh grader who would undoubtedly make the play, whatever it happened to be. But then I thought, “Man, it’s really on the line here. What if I DON’T make the play? What if I screw this up?”

The ball wasn’t hit to the left of me, it wasn’t hit to the right of me. It wasn’t a little dabbler that I would have to charge and rush to make the play. It was hit RIGHT AT ME. Not on a rope, either. A routine ground ball. I could do anything I wanted to with that ball. Step on third and toss it to first; get it to second and let Josh turn the double play over to first himself, tag the runner and THEN throw it to second….ANYTHING! The single second that that routine ground ball took to get to me seemed an eternity. I panicked. And you guessed it. It hit the heel of my glove, rolled up to my chest, nipped my chin, and I looked like a fumbling fool trying to gather up that little piece of leather and stitches. In the time that it took me to finally get the ball in my glove, the batter had already reached first base, all other runners were safe, and a run had scored – tieing the game. I remember being SO mad at my inability to field that ground ball – which ultimately stemmed from my own doubt in being able to make that play – that I immediately SPIKED the ball SO hard that it bounced off the dirt into the air what seemed to be about 20 feet high. High enough for the winning run to score from third. GAME OVER.

The moral of the story is that what you conceive in your inner world is realized in your outer world. If you are not confident in your own abilities in your inner world, your outer world is reflected by that. If you doubt yourself, tasks will never be accomplished to the degree you wish them to. Try something new, and try it TRUSTING yourself that it will turn out not just okay, but good! You may just surprise yourself.

Self-ImageHow I feel about how you feel about me. Ever taken a public speaking course? Why does everyone absolutely DREAD public speaking? People will always say the same answer – I just hate speaking in front of large groups. Why is that? It’s because people fear that others’ reactions, no matter how confident we are on our knowledge about any certain subject that we are speaking about, will be not satisfactory. We start to doubt ourselves and our abilities, but more so, if people will laugh at us, not pay attention to us, or most importantly – say that we didn’t do a good job. The person with a low self-image has anxiety about everything the public can see about you and starts to panic with random thoughts. Is my zipper down?” “Is my hair messed up?” “Do people not trust me?” “Will more successful people than I sense that I’m not confident?” “Oh, I better not ask that successful person for their opinion because they will think that my idea is stupid.” A low self-image in our adult years is sometimes the result of accumulated criticisms one has received over the years as a child or adolescent. We look at people more successful than us or look at people who have authority in our families and take either a negative or positive criticism and apply it to our own self image.

To have a high self-image, you MUST be confident in your beliefs in yourself, what you hope to achieve and not worry about how others view you. My favorite quote is “You were born an original, do not die a copy.” We’re all individuals. We are all different. We all hope to achieve different things. If you constantly worry about how one of your peers is going to view you and your actions, it TOO is another anchor that will prevent you from moving forward. Advice is free, be cautious of who you take it from. If you are about to make a big financial decision, who do you think you would want to seek out for advice, a friend who is knowledgeable in financial planning and investments or your broke uncle who is living paycheck to paycheck? Anyone can give advice, but the people that give it to you do NOT have to live with the results that result from YOUR choice. Make your choice YOURS. Do not live your life based on the approval of others.

Self-Worth Whether you truly believe you deserve the results that will come from your actions. Anyone ever heard of achievement anxiety? It’s a form of fear of failure, but more importantly, it’s not a fear of accomplishing the task at hand, it’s being anxious or doubting that you deserve the benefit or will be able to handle the benefit that you achieve. For example, most sales positions are paid in some sort of commission. When I first started in my “real” sales career, I was paid a minimal base salary, given great benefits, and was paid a commission based on the sales that I brought in. There were benchmarks on what was expected. As I gained experience on the job and became more confident, my income grew. Looking back, sure my income grew from day one to say, fifteen months on the job, but then it plateaued. Why did that happen? Now one would answer, “Well, I worked hard and I made great money, enough for me to pay all of my monthly bills, contribute to my retirement and my savings, and still have a little left over to play with and have a social life.” But why did my income plateau? I probably would have said back then, “If I’m comfortable and paying my bills, then I guess I’m working just hard enough to make a living and nothing more.” At a position where there is NO cap on commission, where there is NO LIMIT on the potential of income, why was I only working hard enough for me to pay my bills and be comfortable?? Because I looked at making an exteme amount of money as being unrealistic, but furthermore and more importantly, I didn’t feel that I DESERVED an extreme amount of money. This thought process comes from our environment. Especially with the Occupy Movement currently, rich people are looked at as selfish, as ignorant, as un-caring, thoughtless people. We are taught “anti-rich” thoughts as children with phrases like “stinking rich” or “filthy rich”. We learn to look at wealthy people as snobby and greedy. We are unknowingly TRAINED to think negatively about having extreme amounts of money.

I remember during a sales meeting in August of 2010, we were asked by our Vice President of Sales to tear a sheet of paper out of our notepads and write down how much income we would like to make; what we each wanted to strive to make in a year. We all tore out a piece of paper, wrote down our number down, folded our papers up and passed them down the conference table to the VP. There were numerous numbers from $150,000 all the way up to $500,000 a year. As the numbers were being read aloud and passed aside to read the next, the VP said, “Wow, only $80,000? Someone doesn’t have very high expectations for themselves.” That was me. I was already on pace to hit that $80,000. I didn’t feel I deserved any more than that. I had a very, VERY, low self-worth. My confidence in my job affected my self-esteem, which affected how I felt about how others felt about me, which affected how I felt about the rewards I realized in my outer world – or my self-worth. Furthermore, I was fearful of not only how I would be perceived in my family or by my friends if I did make more than that, but fearful of how I would MANAGE that money. See, self-worth is KEY for money management. People with money are looked to as ignorant and snobbish. People who come from low-income households have negative perceptions about wealthy people. We are unknowingly trained to rid ourselves of money because we subconsiously 1) don’t feel we deserve it, and 2) we do not want to be looked at by others in the same way. See, as soon as I got paid I would make sure my bills were paid and instead of saving any money for a rainy day, I would piss it away by spending hundreds of dollars at the bar. I would piss it away gambling hundreds of dollars at the casino. I would buy stupid things that I didn’t need. I would do ANYTHING to get that money away from me because I was so fearful of being looked at as a wealthy person. I didn’t feel I deserved the wealth. That is why most people who come from low-income households stay in the same financial situation. They fear that their families or their friends will look at them as being “too good” for them, or “leaving them behind”.

Get out of that mindset! Feel in your heart that you are comfortable and confident in your abilities. Feel in your heart that others look to you for knowledge, leadership, and they ultimately respect you – that is if your actions are lawful and moral. If they don’t, you can’t control how people react so don’t worry about it. And most importantly, believe in your heart that you FULLY deserve every single reward that comes from your faith, your hard work, and your determination.

Brian McCann of the Atlanta Braves hit a Grand Slam against the Philadelphia Phillies Wednesday Night. Looks like Michael Bourn needs to work on his double high five technique!!!


I’ve never heard of this guy, but obviously we think this is pretty damn cool!!!

SINGAPORE — Korean entertainer Kim Hyun-joong plans to kick off his “2012 Asia Fan Meeting Tour” by high-fiving all 3,000 people expected to turn up – a first for a pop star visiting Singapore.

Event organizer “Running Into The Sun” said the original plan was for Kim to high-five 500 fans selected from the audience but Kim was insisting on high-fiving everyone.

“I know it’s not going to be easy and I hope that even if it is a really short moment of high-five, the fans would know how much I appreciate their effort and support,” he said.

He will meet his fans at the stadium exit after the event ends.

Kim told The Associated Press on Thursday he’s confident security won’t be an issue.

The tour that starts Friday includes Hong Kong, Taiwan, China and Thailand. Organizers say Kim will high-five everyone at fan events in Hong Kong and Taiwan, too.

Kim is part of the boy band SS501 and became hugely popular across Asia after appearing in the 2009 Korean TV drama “Boys Over Flowers.”

His solo debut album, “Break Down,” was released in 2011.

Taken from The Huffington Post. Read Full Article Here”>

It’s National High Five Day!!! Check out a recent tour of Saint Paul, Minnesota….high fiving people on their lunch break!!!