Posts Tagged ‘motivation’

It was February of 2011 and I had just finished up an amazing visit to the city of Chicago with a few friends and a few new ones.  A blizzard had gone through Minneapolis/Saint Paul, and an airport closure that had cancelled thousands of flights back into MSP meant that it was going to be a busy day at the airport at Midway Airport in Chicago.  I didn’t have to be back at the office until 11 am that next day, so I called Delta Airlines and offered to give up my flight on the early 7 am flight in case my seat was needed by anyone needing it and took instead a seat on the later 9:30 flight.

Now that I had a couple of extra hours in the morning, I decided to go out with a bang in Chicago.  Found a bar called Halligan – an old Irish bar and Firefighter hangout – which had great specials and a lively atmosphere.  I met more awesome fun people and enjoyed my last night in the city.

Even with the later flight…you can imagine after a good night out I still managed to be running late for my flight.  Good thing I was already packed….j quickly showered, grabbed my bag and made my way towards the train to the airport.  As I reached the Delta ticket counter at Midway, the ticket agent informed me that I was supposed to be on the 7 am flight….my change request was never processed and because of the cancellations the day before, there were no other seat openings for the rest of the day.  The old me would have been fuming….but the new me just laughed it off.  I’d find a way to win.

I didn’t panic…in fact, my first thought was that I was absolutely starving and saw my misfortune as a chance to get breakfast, haha!  I got back on the train and headed back towards Downtown Chicago, found myself a Starbucks and planted myself there to plan my strategy.  I called my personal assistant to put them on alert for any openings on Delta that may arise, while I navigated my options on the ground.

My first thought was to find a rental car and just drive back to Minneapolis.  After combing through my travel site, it appeared that because of all the travelers whose flights were cancelled, there were absolutely no cars left in the entire city of Chicago.  Wow.  How else can one get out of Chicago?  I then remembered….MegaBus.

With a smartphone equipped with Google as my only ammo…I searched for MegaBus and found their central location.  I hopped back on the train.  Along the way, I struck up a conversation with a few of the passengers about sports, the city…had such a great time that we exchanged contact information and we still keep in touch to this day.  I arrived at my stop and found myself somewhere on the Southwest side of Chicago.  I quickly realized, only to be confirmed by the lady at the desk, that I wasn’t at the ticket office or the place that the bus actually picks up travelers….I was at the bus garage.  There were about a half dozen drivers who were either on the lunch break or about to start their day sitting at a table playing dominoes and watching Sanford & Son.  I needed to go BACK downtown to the stop.  One of the drivers overheard my dilemma and offered to take me downtown an hour later, he was heading that way anyway.

The next 60 minutes was just a cool experience filled with great conversation and just taking in the comradarie of these bus drivers.  The nicknames, the jokes, the competitiveness of the game, the shop talk…I was completely immersed and in awe of the friendship and the family they created for themselves.  It was just one of those times that you realize that people often spend more time with the people they work with than their own families….your work family is a family too.

I arrive downtown at the stop on Canal Street to a crowd of people awaiting their bus out of town.  I instantly spot a gentleman collecting tickets, ask him where I BUY a ticket, and he tells me that I have to call or go online.  I call the 800 number, thinking I’m 20 minutes away from finally getting on my way back home….only for the ticket agent on the other end to tell me that there are no openings on the bus for TWO MORE DAYS.  Again….there was nothing I could do but laugh it off.

Next move, I call my personal assistant to see if there is any progress on either any seats on flights or any rental cars.  Zero zilch nada.  I decided to just head back to the airport and actually talk to an agent at any of the rental car companies and see if there happens to be ANYTHING available.  I get back to Midway and go to the Hertz counter….and was told that there is a minivan available, but I’d have to go to the location in Chinatown to get it.  Ugh. 

Another train ride!  At this point I’m absolutely just loving the adventure.  I hop BACK on the train eagerly hoping the train moves faster so I can get to the rental car before anyone else puts a claim on it.  I was more excited than a kid on a road trip asking “Are we there yet?” repeatedly.

The train got about 4 stops away when I get a phone call.

“Rich, where are you?” my personal assistant asked.

“I’m on the train heading to Hertz to get a rental car.” 

“I found an opening on the 4:25 flight out of Chicago back to Minneapolis.  I can hold it for you, but you need to get back to the airport NOW to claim it!”

I always think of this story when I find myself in a situation where I’m met with an initial disappointment.  Sometimes it’s just NOT EASY.  Obstacles will be put in your way sometimes, but you have to FIND A WAY TO WIN.  Sometimes, these obstacles are put in your way as a test…a test to see if you want it bad enough.  In my experience, if you have faith that you will get it, if you are determined to get it, and commit to action….the universe will conspire to make it happen for you.  It’s not guaranteed, but one thing that is guaranteed is that you’ll never get what you want with a crap attitude and quitting at the first sign of resistance.  My (extra) day in Chicago could’ve been viewed and perceived as one big headache….but it was a great learning lesson that gave me the opportunity to grow and meet MORE people along the way.

Determine what you want.  Free yourself of distractions.  Be open and aware of your surroundings.  Be prepared to sacrifice.  Have faith in yourself and your abilities to navigate the course..

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20140612-161228-58348283.jpg. Self-fulfilling prophecy. It’s the concept in which one has either a positive or negative expectation about circumstances, events, or other people and that the very expectation one has causes the exact behavior that allows those expectations to be fulfilled.

In the service industry, self-fulfilling prophecies are everywhere…most commonly, a server who has waited on a certain customer before and had been tipped badly, so the next time they come in, they tell the server who is waiting on them that they’re bad tippers, and voila! That server doesn’t give them good service and they don’t get a good tip!

Don’t pay attention to these claims! I had this happen time and time again, and each time I did, my thought process was, “They’re not bad tippers, they just tipped YOU badly” and I’ll show that server my 20-30% tip after the customer received great, genuine service. People will PAY for VALUE received.

What self-fulfilling prophecy are you telling yourself ABOUT yourself? And most importantly…listening to about yourself??? Most get “stuck” because they listen to their own voices of the past, and those voices continually reinforce this prophecy that things will never be better, so why even try?
Decide that in order for you to realize value, you need to value yourself, and that you need to PROVIDE value TO yourself. Read good books, not the fad fiction of today. Listen to audios. Read the Bible. Exercise. Take time out of the day for you. Meditate. Pamper yourself with a professional massage. A pedicure. Take action today towards something you want. The big thing you want tomorrow can be reduced to a small action that can be done today. See yourself TIPPING you abundantly. What kind of service would you provide yourself if you KNEW you would receive a good tip from yourself?

Paying bills is fun, right?

Growing up on Saint Paul, MN’s West Side, having went to a high school where 25% of the people who I started the ninth grade with didn’t graduate with me four years later, it’s easy to get into a mindset of being fearful of being successful. We are taught inadvertently by our environment to look at those who are “well-to-do” or “rich” in a negative light. This is evidenced by sayings that we all heard growing up such as “Filthy Rich” and the like.

Let’s have a discussion here. I’m a very logical guy, so I’m going to follow a very logical format. We all grow up wanting to live the lavish lifestyle, dreaming of never having to work, dreams of relaxing on the beach without a care in the world, wishing all the bills would just pay themselves and finally getting to shed that stress and anxiety each time the 1st of the month comes and the rent or mortgage was due, correct?

So what do we do? We look at people that have what we want – everything I’ve mentioned in the above paragraph – and we say they are lucky, or maybe we are even jealous that they don’t have to endure the stresses that we do today. We THINK that everything they have in their life has been handed to them and they don’t know how it is to walk even a block in our shoes. We curse those who have more than us.

Is it their fault? No. There is a old Polynesian saying that says, “Bless that which you want.” How can you get the things you want out of life if you constantly curse those which have what you want? If you think that the people that have what you want are merely “lucky”, then you must think that someday this “luck” will happen to you, right? Wrong. It won’t! By dismissing those who have what you want, you are associating negative thoughts to the things that you SAY you want to most. Notice my choice of words. Just because you say you want something, doesn’t make it true. It’s what you think, it’s how you view them, it’s what you believe. If you think rich people are the devil, you are constantly pushing away any possibility for you to be financially free. Chances are that you will spend your life constantly struggling to pay the bills and will have hardly any cash on reserve for emergencies. Oh, the alternator went out in your car? Your water heater went out in your house? These things we have hardly any control of, in fact, we KNOW they aren’t built to last but those with a poverty mindset will associate these events that we know will happen at one point in time or another as “oh, poor me” or “the worst things always happen to me”.

If you want a life free of stress, anxiety, constant struggle, try changing your financial mindset. In the following video of Dr. Walter Sims, he explains that “money is not the root of all evil, only the LOVE of money is.”

A nurse has recorded the most common regrets of the dying, and among the top ones is ‘I wish I hadn’t worked so hard’. What would your biggest regret be if this was your last day of life?

A palliative nurse has recorded the top five regrets of the dying. Photograph: Montgomery Martin/Alamy

There was no mention of more sex or bungee jumps. A palliative nurse who has counselled the dying in their last days has revealed the most common regrets we have at the end of our lives. And among the top, from men in particular, is ‘I wish I hadn’t worked so hard’.

Bronnie Ware is an Australian nurse who spent several years working in palliative care, caring for patients in the last 12 weeks of their lives. She recorded their dying epiphanies in a blog called Inspiration and Chai, which gathered so much attention that she put her observations into a book called The Top Five Regrets of the Dying.

Ware writes of the phenomenal clarity of vision that people gain at the end of their lives, and how we might learn from their wisdom. “When questioned about any regrets they had or anything they would do differently,” she says, “common themes surfaced again and again.”

Here are the top five regrets of the dying, as witnessed by Ware:

1. I wish I’d had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me.

“This was the most common regret of all. When people realise that their life is almost over and look back clearly on it, it is easy to see how many dreams have gone unfulfilled. Most people had not honoured even a half of their dreams and had to die knowing that it was due to choices they had made, or not made. Health brings a freedom very few realise, until they no longer have it.”

2. I wish I hadn’t worked so hard.

“This came from every male patient that I nursed. They missed their children’s youth and their partner’s companionship. Women also spoke of this regret, but as most were from an older generation, many of the female patients had not been breadwinners. All of the men I nursed deeply regretted spending so much of their lives on the treadmill of a work existence.”

3. I wish I’d had the courage to express my feelings.

“Many people suppressed their feelings in order to keep peace with others. As a result, they settled for a mediocre existence and never became who they were truly capable of becoming. Many developed illnesses relating to the bitterness and resentment they carried as a result.”

4. I wish I had stayed in touch with my friends.

“Often they would not truly realise the full benefits of old friends until their dying weeks and it was not always possible to track them down. Many had become so caught up in their own lives that they had let golden friendships slip by over the years. There were many deep regrets about not giving friendships the time and effort that they deserved. Everyone misses their friends when they are dying.”

5. I wish that I had let myself be happier.

“This is a surprisingly common one. Many did not realise until the end that happiness is a choice. They had stayed stuck in old patterns and habits. The so-called ‘comfort’ of familiarity overflowed into their emotions, as well as their physical lives. Fear of change had them pretending to others, and to their selves, that they were content, when deep within, they longed to laugh properly and have silliness in their life again.”

What’s your greatest regret so far, and what will you set out to achieve or change before you die?

Read the original article at The Guardian.