Posts Tagged ‘entertainment’

20140622-153922-56362590.jpgYou know what I’m talking about. Your friends post constantly, like clockwork, each and every Sunday night about it. The old “back to reality” in the morning. Mine was so bad when four years ago when I worked as a software sales manager that it started right when I left the office on Friday night; because I knew, like clockwork, as sure as the sky was blue, that the Monday morning alarm clock would be going off again…signaling the beginning of a long, stressful work week.

If you love your job these days, you’re lucky. Most these days aren’t in your position. A lot of people are working at jobs that they are clearly overqualified for and underpaid. A ton more actually love their job but despise the fact that they are financially shackled to it. Meaning…if disaster were to strike, if tragedy were to present themselves, they’d have no other way to support themselves and their family. Because they know of no other way to do that, they continue on doing the only thing they know.

That’s exactly where I was four years ago this month. June of 2010 was when the decline of my job and the increase of the unhappiness set in. I began questioning if my hard work and the stress was worth it. Sure, I made money, but more time and effort were demanded of me in return for less and less money. This is when I had my first thoughts of leaving. But because I knew of no other way…I stayed.

What happens when we love our jobs but begin experiencing this type of resentment for it is because we realize that we’d rather be doing something ELSE with our TIME. Whether it be spending more time with our family, spending time on vacation, seeing the world, giving back more to the community, whatever our dreams may be….we’d rather be doing THAT than exchanging time in our life for dollars in our wallet. But because we stay so busy with our JOBS, we hardly have any time to devote to our DREAMS.

I believe that God out dreams in our heart not to torment us, but for us to have at least one bit of intrinsic motivation to go for them. For us to have some type of gauge to let us know – and that gauge most often shows us through depression, unhappiness, uneasiness, stress – that what we’re doing isn’t bringing us any closer to what we want.

How would it feel for you to not have to wake up to an alarm each Monday morning? To still be able to provide whole-heartedly for your family, not just financially, but with the most important currency there is, TIME? To be able to serve others, something that most of us are conditioned not to do because we’re so worried about taking care of ourselves first?

Whatever it is you want to do, take a step towards it. Don’t wait. Take steps TODAY. Like Chinese philosopher Lao Tzu said, “the journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.” MLK once said, “Faith is taking the first step even when you can’t see the whole staircase.”

If you are currently looking and are open to a concept that will get you not only in the right direction, but to your destination, click on the “Work With Rich” tab above.

This cute little tyke wanted to get in on the dancing at this wedding reception….but a high five did the job just fine!

What are you passions? Go for them!

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We live in a world where we have big dreams of what we want to be growing up.

We live in a world where way too often people have no problem telling us that our dreams are crazy.

We live in a world where being a “dreamer” has negative connotations. That being a “dreamer” means to not be living in reality.

Because society has made up the rules of how life should be lived, too often our dreams go by the wayside.

For me, that meant giving up everything I wanted to do in life to try to fit in to what society said was appropriate.

I’m not against the idea of hard work, but giving all of your heart, time, and passion 50-70 hours a week doesn’t leave a lot of time to chase a dream.

We all fall into the trap.

When you know that what you’re doing isn’t going to produce the results that you want, when you know what you’re doing isn’t your passion, you can feel it. It tugs at your heart strings. You get that knot in your stomach. That feeling of emptiness. The beginnings of hatred against your job.

At the end, it meant losing my mind.

It meant walking away from a career that “others” told me was the best thing that ever happened to me.

It meant not the end, it meant the beginning. The beginning of the rest of my life.

It meant having my moment with God. It meant letting go of all of the anger, regret, and resentment….all of the jealousy, what if’s, and should have’s.

It meant receiving a chance.

It meant asking myself, “What’s next?”

I remember sitting there on my mother’s couch like it was yesterday. This was the same couch that I had made into my bed for the previous 60 days up until then. The same couch that I had done nothing but sit and stare aimlessly into the television while I smoked two packs a day. Up until that point, I thought it was too late for me to live my dreams. I thought life had passed me by. I BELIEVED there was nothing left for me.

I remember sitting at the Thanksgiving Day table. Thanksgiving has always been my favorite holiday. A day to see family, have great food, watch football. Normally, it would be me screaming, “Hey…pass the turkey!” but on this day, it was me whispering, “Um, can you please pass the potatoes?”
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I remember sitting there thinking to myself “What the hell am I doing? Why am I beating myself up so bad?”

You see I have learned in one main thing over the last couple of years. To not listen to the opinions of others especially if they do not have to live to the results. I’m not a master at this statement by any stretch of the imagination, YET, anyway. But at that moment I realized that I had spent so much of my life listening to what other people thought was best for me. Giving up so much of what I wanted to do in life because people thought what I was doing was stupid, or crazy, or impossible. At that moment, it was engrained in me that it was time for me to stop living my life like that.

And the first thing I did? I went into the kitchen, YouTubed the most popular song on the radio at the time, and started singing along. It was Cee-lo’s “F#$k You.”

Man did it feel great. Singing had always been a passion of mine and it still is. I remember as a child making up melodies and words to those melodies and singing them on the front porch for all to hear. Ha…it makes me laugh out loud just writing about it. I hear this all too often from people who overcome depression – remembering a passion from their childhood and doing it.

I grew up taking keyboarding lessons. Gave that up in sixth grade. On two occasions since then, I bought keyboards that just sat in the house like a treadmill gathers clothes and eventually got thrown out because there wasn’t time in the day to play it.

After I had my singing marathon, I started reconnecting. Reconnecting with all of the people that life had gotten in the way of. Everyone has these people in their life. The people where we run into that we hadn’t seen in years and always promise to each other that we’ll make plans to meet up but it never happens. It felt good to be alive.

Then I began writing down what I wanted to do with the rest of my life. My first passion – singing – I thought it would be a great idea since I love singing karaoke, to start my own entertainment company. Then, I heard something that changed my life. “Turn your mess into your message.”

I realized that I wasn’t the only one in the history of the world that has suffered from anxiety and depression. If I could overcome it, so could others and I wanted more than anything in the world…to help. If I could share my experiences, my thought processes during and after, maybe…just maybe….it may help one person. If I did that, then I’ve done my job. It also meant me being a better person, better than I ever was.

I began sharing my story with people I hadn’t seen in years. People began sharing their stories back to me. I was connecting with friends in a way that I hadn’t ever in my life. People were thanking me for giving them hope.

There also were a lot of people who weren’t used to this person, the person I turned into. People were still used to the person they knew. When sharing my story with others, people would say that it sounded like I was throwing a pity party for myself. People would say that Rich is changing, and they would say it in a way that wasn’t positive.

I held an event Cinco de Mayo 2011 in an effort to raise money for my high school and for the local community center. It was going to be a tall task to get it organized and for it to be successful, but I was up for it. Even if it didn’t produce the results I hoped, at least I knew that I would give it my all. In sales I learned “If you don’t ask, the answer is always no.” The same applies for trying new things. You can’t get anything done if you don’t try first.

The event from the outside looking in was a disaster. Out of a necessary 1800 needed, about 150 people showed up. We didn’t raise nearly the amount of money we needed to. But in my eyes, it was an overwhelming success. See, most people looked at what I was trying to do and told me that it was a stupid idea, it would never work, and I heard some very negative things from people I thought were my good friends about how it was stupid for me to try something like that. In fact, while the event was happening, I could see right across the street a bunch of my friends that had gathered. They probably saw from afar that the event wasn’t going to be a success, but instead of standing in support with me on my side of the street, they laughed from across it.

Do you think that a married couple would stop a ceremony because they saw that one person didn’t show up that said that they were going to be there? Then why should you stop your dreams and your aspirations if ONE PERSON in your life says that what you want to do is stupid??? DO IT!

These people are called DreamStealers. Some are more direct and harsh, which should be the type you desire because at least you can see them coming. These are the ones that will tell you directly to your face what you’re doing is stupid. But then there are the ones that sneak up on you. The ones that you think that they have your back but they smile to your face and talk about you behind your back. OR, they can be people who genuinely care about you and want to look out for you, and because they fully don’t understand what you’re doing, they try to persuade you to stop doing what you’re doing.

All that matters is your dream. Keep going after it. What I really want to say is that there will be times where you get one of these DreamStealers who sneak up on you…and it sucks. That pit comes back to your stomach. Where you get that feeling of emptiness. You need to be strong. To be resolute that your dream is YOURS. It’s what you’re living for. It’s always been a passion in your life. Sure, you let it go for a short time, but now that you got it back you aren’t ever letting go.

I’d like to take the last day before this holiday weekend to recognize some friends who have had some absolutely remarkable things happen for them these past few months! We can always stand to step back for a few moments and appreciate the good things in our lives. I heard a saying yesterday that will stick with me for quite some time – “You can’t get a good look at the picture, if you’re part of the frame.” Well today, I’d like to show some recognition to my friends for some of their recent accomplishments.

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Great work on your mile run, Bill!

Bill Lage of 365 Things To Do In The Twin Cities recently ran the Medtronic Twin Cities 1 Mile, and ran it in 10:06, coming up short of his goal to run it in under 10 minutes. However, when the official results were posted on the website, Bill’s time came in at 9:37.9! Strong work, Bill!

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Andrew Lonergan promotes a healthy lifestyle and raises awareness about Diabetes Prevention on “Project Not Me”.

When my friend and business partner Andrew Lonergan told me last summer that he was going to be appearing in a new reality show, I thought he had gone crazy. But he is. Project Not Me will be airing this coming fall on Lifetime and is part of the Diabetes Prevention Program, aimed to raise awareness, help those that are at risk of Type 2 Diabetes and how people just like us can prevent this disease. Can’t wait until it airs, Lonny!!!

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David and his girlfriend Krystal in Las Vegas

In this economy, it’s scary for people of all ages. Just this week it was announced that two local Minnesota companies will be cutting jobs. Social Security will not be around for us. College kids are pumping millions and billions of dollars into their college education with little to no return on that investment because the job market is so dry. Well, tell that to my friend David Helegeson who got started with The Coolest Travel Club In The World about 10 months ago. With one decision to do something different in the travel industry, he has grown an organization of over 1200 customers allowing him to achieve the rank of Marketing Director in a worldwide, world-class company. He also received news that he will be speaking to hundreds of people at a conference in Cedar Rapids, Iowa in June to train people how they can do the same thing themselves. Proud of you, David!

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Lisa Larrive at her recent book signing for Grateful For Gluten-Free

My good friend and business partner Lisa Larrive has written a book called “Grateful For Gluten-Free.” It’s about a young girl named Gabby who has celiac disease. Gabby cannot eat foods with wheat or gluten, and she loves it when her Mom makes her favorite gluten-free food – PANCAKES! Gabby’s journey helps her discover how grateful she is to live gluten-free – not only because it is delicious, but because it can be fun too! Great work, Lisa, in raising the awareness for celiac disease and the gluten-free lifestyle. Please give her Grateful For Gluten-Free Facebook Page a like, and purchase a copy on Amazon.

Michelle Beadle and Colin Cowherd of SportsNation discuss the invention of a High Five Machine invented in Turkey. Hmm.

I love that they love to high five on this show.

Have a great Mothers Day weekend everyone!

Brian McCann of the Atlanta Braves hit a Grand Slam against the Philadelphia Phillies Wednesday Night. Looks like Michael Bourn needs to work on his double high five technique!!!


I’ve never heard of this guy, but obviously we think this is pretty damn cool!!!

SINGAPORE — Korean entertainer Kim Hyun-joong plans to kick off his “2012 Asia Fan Meeting Tour” by high-fiving all 3,000 people expected to turn up – a first for a pop star visiting Singapore.

Event organizer “Running Into The Sun” said the original plan was for Kim to high-five 500 fans selected from the audience but Kim was insisting on high-fiving everyone.

“I know it’s not going to be easy and I hope that even if it is a really short moment of high-five, the fans would know how much I appreciate their effort and support,” he said.

He will meet his fans at the stadium exit after the event ends.

Kim told The Associated Press on Thursday he’s confident security won’t be an issue.

The tour that starts Friday includes Hong Kong, Taiwan, China and Thailand. Organizers say Kim will high-five everyone at fan events in Hong Kong and Taiwan, too.

Kim is part of the boy band SS501 and became hugely popular across Asia after appearing in the 2009 Korean TV drama “Boys Over Flowers.”

His solo debut album, “Break Down,” was released in 2011.

Taken from The Huffington Post. Read Full Article Here”>

It’s National High Five Day!!! Check out a recent tour of Saint Paul, Minnesota….high fiving people on their lunch break!!!

High Fives Are Free tips their hat to Mike Wallace, a tough, gritty reporter whose public talks of depression and mental illness was one of the main inspirations for this organization. Here’s to knocking down the stigma of mental illness. This article is taken from CNN.


Mike Wallace on Depression – CBS Cares

Since his death at age 93 Saturday, much has been written about hard-edged ex-“60 Minutes” reporter Mike Wallace’s epic verbal battles with world leaders, swindlers and alleged crime bosses.

But in 2005, Wallace made news of his own when he acknowledged his longtime war with depression – a fight that nearly caused him to take his own life.

“I came perilously close to committing suicide,” Wallace wrote in his memoir “Between You and Me.”

He described in dramatic detail how he was crushed by a devastating depression fueled by stress from a $120 million libel suit over a 1982 CBS documentary about the Vietnam War. The subsequent trial, he wrote, pushed him “more deeply into a dark and devastating malaise, which was crushing my spirit and even sapping my will to live.”

Going public with his struggle did much to help others know they weren’t alone, said Dr. Charles Raison, CNNhealth’s mental health expert.

Telling everyone that someone as famously intelligent and successful as Wallace could be taken down by the disease helped to lessen the social stigma that often comes with the label “clinically depressed,” said Raison, an associate professor of psychiatry at the University of Arizona College of Medicine.

It wasn’t surprising the pit bull of old-school TV journalism had the tenacity to confront his demons in public – displaying his dirty laundry on his own terms. It was classic Wallace, the king of confrontation using the tools of his trade to melt away the stigma like so many scandal-plagued politicians sweating under hot TV lights.

Wallace’s admission humanized him against a self-described “tough guy” reputation, said Dr. Aaron Rochlen, a professor of psychology at the University of Texas at Austin.

“There was a lot of positive reaction and appreciation for his public acknowledgment of what was going on for him. It took self-awareness and courage for him to admit that.”

Americans have been more open about their depression in recent years, Rochlen said. The issue has been appearing in pop culture, such as Tony Soprano’s discussion of depression. Soprano’s therapy was a central theme of “The Sopranos,” which was “important in impacting impressions about men and mental health and in therapy,” Rochlen said. “Former NFL quarterback Terry Bradshaw has been very open about his struggles with depression. So I do think there’s been a cultural shift in terms of decreasing stigma, but there’s a long way to go.”

Wallace wrote in his book that he’d sought help from a doctor he’d been going to for years. But that doctor, he said, failed to recognize Wallace was sliding into a clinical depression.

“That’s terribly common,” Raison said. “Studies in both the UK and the U.S. suggest that that happens more than 50% percent of the time. There have been studies in the United States that suggest that of all the people that have clinical depression – probably less than 25% get adequate, appropriate treatment.”

Wallace wrote he was losing his appetite and was taking sleeping pills to offset insomnia during the trial.

“This is a classic symptom,” Raison said. “Among men, somewhere between 90% and 95% of people who get emotionally depressed will demonstrate changes in sleep and appetite. In women, it’s almost 100%.”

Wallace also wrote that he feared the lawsuit and trial – brought by William C. Westmoreland, the retired U.S. Army general who had led U.S. troops in Vietnam – would irreparably damage his reputation as a reporter, which experts say also would have contributed to his deepening depression.

Men often connect their sense of well-being to their careers and their career-related success, Rochlen said.

“When there are threats to that success or obstacles to reaching their goals, that can spur on a depression,” he said.

Raison added, “The stressers that are most likely to make people depressed are things that threaten their image of who they are. Things that are likely to make you lose status, lose power, lose the respect of other people, lose everything you’ve built, destroy what you think your life is about. Even when the stresser gets fixed, the depression often persists.”

Wallace wrote it was only because of the “love and caring support from a friend” that he was able to avert taking his own life.

“Mood disorders seem to be linked to both creativity and intelligence, according to a number of studies,” Raison said. The message: Anyone can suffer from clinical depression.

“Anyone who saw Mike Wallace decimate these people during interviews, you wouldn’t pick him as a guy that had depression,” Raison said. “When you’re depressed, it’s very, very hard to do anything. Isn’t it amazing that a guy who was so bullish, so pro-active, so driven, could at the same time suffer with the condition that eliminates those traits? That’s what really struck me.”